Personal Financial Report & M.I.P (Monthly Investment Plan)

Here I’m going to illustrate my personal financial report followed by my monthly investing allotment “plan” (M.I.P.)

My income:

I earn approximately $5,000 a month. $60,000 a year, approximately. I am fortunate that I have a stable and reliable income at my age to use as a foundation to build my investment portfolio. But there are expenses…

 

My current (approximated) monthly expenses: 

Vehicle & Insurance – $650 (wonders of driving in my age in California)

Rent – $750 (small studio apartment)

Utilities – $200

Food & Gas – $450

Education – $350

Miscellaneous – $300

Total Expenses = $2,700

Income After Expenses: $5,000 – $2,700 = +$2,300

Not bad. Realistically, my expenses monthly vary because I do provide financial support for my mother and some other family members from time to time, but it still approximates to what was stated above.

 

Savings:

Also, I dedicate $500 a month to my “Buy A House” fund (important asset), and an additional $500 a month to a “Oh Shit!” fund.

 

Actual Dollar Amount for Investing:

This leaves me with about $1,300 a month. Leaving the $300 for a buffer of safety, I plan to invest $1,000 a month to build a high-yielding portfolio. About 20% of my total net income.

 

Projection:

In theory, in 5 years X $1,000 monthly investment with an average 5.5% dividend yield (since I’m personally seeking the highest yielding stocks on the market) – I’ll be raking in $3,300 annually/$825 quarterly from dividends.

Seems like a good starting point. Although I know plans don’t always go, well, according to plan, I’d rather have one than not. Especially with finances, it is easy to get swept away in the consumerism and spend all of our hard earned money. But those days are over for me, it’s time I start making my money work hard!

 

What is your M.I.P.?

 

Hey guys, I appreciate you checking out dividend-investor. Sign up below if you would like to receive a couple emails a month for blog updates, new dividend stock purchases, and give-away’s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Portfolio Update – 07/14/2017

I’ll kick this site off by giving a quick look into my current holdings. I know my current holdings are rather weakish, however, I had to start somewhere. I’ve been rather passive on my recent investing habits, but that is going to change. I am developing a realistic and passive financial-plan to invest more heavily into dividend stocks, which I’ll write about soon.

Here is my current portfolio snapshot (yes, it’s currently only one stock):

Stock Ticker: ABR – Arbor Realty Trust (REIT)

Currently: 179 Shares, purchased @ $8.30 w/ Yield @ 8.75%

Total Cost: $1,485.70

Estimated Annual Dividend: 128.88 / Quarterly: 32.22

 

Why REIT’s?

I did a lot of research into REIT’s, and I really liked what I found. First of all, they are income-producing real estate companies that pay out at least 90% of their profits as dividends. They also have very solid overall performance. Despite the 2007-08 real estate market crash, they’ve generated a 14% annual return. That is better than the S&P 500’s return between the same time period, which was only 12%.

But as with everything good, there is always a downside. The dividends paid by REIT’s are subject to taxation as ordinary income, not capital gains tax. So, if you’re in a high tax bracket, this may not be favorable. However, in my current position, it is still beneficial. Secondly, REIT’s are known to be volatile, often acting with non-traditional market behaviors. However, as an investor, ups and downs shouldn’t be all that concerning. We are in it for the long haul, reaping those delicious dividend rewards.

Why Arbor Realty Trust?

It’s shown decent and promising growth reflected in the financial reports, along with solid fundamentals such as assets, net profits, liabilities, etc. Numerous analyst’s have concluded that ABR is undervalued, and has tremendous growth potential. Ivan Kaufman, the CEO is personally heavily invested in the company, which I always see as a good indicator of the company’s overall promising future. With all that aside, what I really love is the cheap price, with the very high yield and it’s growth potential. ABR has shown steady and maintainable growth since it’s bottom in 2009, I believe the company will come back stronger than ever.

Here’s just a chart I grabbed off of capitalcube.com, highlighting ABR’s undervaluation and high earnings momentum.

Earnings Momentum Vs Relative Valuation

As you could see, on the top right ABR-US, ranks high on the Undervalued/High Earnings Momentum chart.

Thanks for reading, I’ll provide more updates soon, just thought I’d provide a little insight into what I’m working with so far. Thanks for reading.

-Andrew

 

Also, if you’d like to sign up for my newsletter, that would be great. I’ll try to provide some useful information, updates to my blog, and some give-away’s.